lalaalush:

Plan on using this one to put a plant in!! Love it :)

lalaalush:

Plan on using this one to put a plant in!! Love it :)

(Source: madebylala)

1 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from lalaceramicideas with 2 notes

italianartsociety:

Italian architect and designer Carlo Scarpa was born on this day in 1906 in Venice. He studied architectural design at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Venice and after graduation would teach at the Istituto Universitario di Architettura, also in Venice. He worked as an artistic consultant for various glassmakers in Murano and served as design consultant to the Venice Biennale from 1948 through 1972. Scarpa was active in the restoration and remodeling of historic buildings and worked on numerous museum and exhibition design projects. 

Reference: Mercedes Daguerre. “Scarpa, Carlo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press.<http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T076342>.

Corroso Vase, 1936, blown glass, produced by Venini, Murano. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Liliane and David M. Stewart Collection, gift of the American Friends of Canada through the generosity of Susan A. Chalom, inv. D84.165.1

Sommerso a Bollicine vase, model 3569, Venini, Italy, 1932, clear glass with gold inclusions, formerly Dimitri Levas Collection

Tessuto Vase1939 (example about 1950-1970), blown glass, produced by Venini, Murano. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Liliane and David M. Stewart Collection, inv. D88.109.1

Brion-Vega Cemetery, 1970-72, San Vito d’Altivole, Italy

Banca Popolare di Verona, 1973, Verona, Italy

1 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from darksilenceinsuburbia with 94 notes

geraldinemcgeechan:

Hydro-phobia ceramics

A fascination for the old Japanese Suminagashi technique forms the basis for the experimental methodology where the hydrophobic reaction between water and oil based pigments is used to create a unique graphic pattern. Due to this process of discrepancy a fractal motif arises on the surface of the water. This fluid pattern of liquid tension is captured and fixated on delicate silk and fine ceramics. A fleeting two-dimensional surface transforms into a tangible and solid whole.

Photography: Raw Color

http://www.jetskevisser.nl/

1 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from tinuon with 21 notes

designedlogic:

thedesignwalker:

concrete

yum

designedlogic:

thedesignwalker:

concrete

yum

1 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from designedlogic with 36 notes

geraldinemcgeechan:

Jieun lee jewellery
human relationship

geraldinemcgeechan:

Jieun lee jewellery

human relationship

1 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from geraldinemcgeechan with 2 notes

31 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from cinoh with 41 notes

31 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from the59thstreetbridge with 332 notes

myampgoesto11:

Glass gellages by Michal Macků

Since the end of 1989, Michal Macku has used his own creative technique which he has named “Gellage” (the ligature of collage and gelatin).

The technique consists of transfer the exposed and fixed photographic emulsion from its original base on paper. This transparent and plastic gelatin substance makes it possible to reshape and reform the original images, changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer. The finished work gives a compact image with a fine surface structure. Created on photographic quality paper, each Gellage is a highly durable print eminently suited for collecting and exhibiting.

The laborious technology, which often includes the use of more than one negative per image, makes it impossible to produce absolutely identical prints: Each Gellage is an original work of art. The artist does make at least 12 signed and numbered prints of each image.

Michal Macku talks about his work: “I use the nude human body (mostly my own) in my pictures. Through the photographic process [of Gellage], this concrete human body is compelled to meet with abstract surroundings and distortions. This connection is most exciting for me and helps me to find new levels of humanness in the resulting work.

Michal Macků combines in this work his gellages technique with large format historic photographic processes and state-of-the-art technology to create the 3D glass photographs-objects, so called glass gellages.

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

31 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from myampgoesto11 with 1,900 notes

brooklynpottery:

James Makins

brooklynpottery:

James Makins

31 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from claythinking with 43 notes

mulkproductdesign:

Inger Steinnes’ ‘Line’ stool utilises discarded leather off cuts to make the seat.

Images from Dailytonic.

31 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from mulkproductdesign with 48 notes